Aging Well in the Gorge July 13th 2022

In the Gorge, we don’t experience Midwest tornadoes or east coast hurricanes, but we do have our summer threats: heat, wildfires, and the accompanying smoke. We’ve all experienced those conditions, but here is a quick reminder on how to be ready.

Prepare an Emergency Kit. It should include food and water to last at least three days – and don’t forget your medications. Also, know where you keep your important documents so you can quickly take them with you.

Create a plan. Do you have a personal support network? A family communication plan? An evacuation plan? A plan for your pet? If you rely on electricity or battery-dependent medical equipment, do you have a plan for a power outage?

Stay informed. Do you have your mobile phone registered with your local emergency notification system such as Citizen’s Alert? This enables Emergency Response Agencies to provide you with critical information quickly. As they’ll tell you, they can’t warn you if they can’t reach you. (All landlines automatically receive emergency notices).

You can register on your county’s website or call one of the following numbers for assistance.

Klickitat County Emergency Management (509) 773-0582)

Wasco County Emergency Management (541) 506-2790

Skamania County Department of Emergency Management (509) 427-8076

Hood River County Sheriff’s Office (541) 386-2098

Sherman County Emergency Services (541) 565-3100

But what causes more deaths than hurricanes, tornadoes, lightning, and floods combined? Heat-related illnesses.

Older adults are at greater risk for heat-related illnesses such as heat exhaustion exhibited by heavy sweating and a rapid pulse. But if untreated it can progress to heat stroke the most severe form of heat illness – a life-threatening emergency that requires immediate medical attention. Symptoms of heat stroke are lack of sweating, headache, confusion, rapid heart rate, nausea or vomiting, and loss of consciousness.

So how do you protect yourself? Stay cool, hydrated, and connected.

Avoid sun exposure; wear light-weight, light-colored and loose-fitting clothes that cover your skin; wear a wide-brimmed hat; try ice packs, cool showers or sponge baths. But do not rely on a fan as your primary cooling device. Fans create air flow and a false sense of comfort but do not reduce body temperature or prevent heat-related illnesses.

Drink plenty of fluids even if you are not thirsty; Drink enough to have to urinate every four hours. The color of your urine is an indicator of whether you are hydrated.

Be aware of local heat advisories; have someone check in on you; and identify places to stay cool such as senior centers, libraries, or your favorite coffee shop.

You can find more information about preparedness at www.Ready.gov. As the saying goes, “Hope for the best, but plan for the worse.”

An inexpensive way to get that deep tan was baby oil. I received correct answers from Rebecca Abrams and Deborah Medina; and Dave Lutgens answered Man Tan a much safer alternative to sunbathing, But this week’s winner of a quilt raffle ticket is Margo Dameier who took sunbathing a step further with a combination of baby oil and iodine which I also used. Remember we were just kids!

From the previous week, those who sent in ”Itsy, Bitsy, Teenie, Weenie Yellow Polka Dot Bikini” were Sandy Haechrel, Donna Mollett, Cindy Winfield, Keith and Marlene Clymer, Maria Kollas, Deborah Medina, Rebecca Abrams, Linda Frizzell, Lana Tepfer, Margo Dameier, Doug Nelson, Rhonda Spies, Jess Birge, Chuck Rice, Billie Maxwell, Stephen Woolpert and this week’s two winners of a quilt raffle ticket: Joy Bee and Bob Sallee. And way back when I missed Rhonda Spies.

A quick Brain Tease: Can you find the next 3 letters in this sequence? o t t f f s s _ _ _

Remember when girls and boys would dye their hair blond or in some unfortunate cases orange? For this week’s “Remember When” question, what was this diluted chemical compound commonly used as a mild antiseptic but also as an inexpensive hair dye? Email your answer to mcseniorcenter@gmail.com, leave a message at 541-296-4788, or mail it with a bottle of H2O2.

Well, it’s been another week, enjoying the mornings on the front porch. Until we meet again, when there’s a problem, acknowledge it, work through it, and move on.

“Life is too short to waste time matching socks.” Forwarded to me by Sandy Haechrel.

Aging Well in the Gorge June 6th 2022

When you consider the key influences affecting your health, are your primary care providers, medical specialists, and prescribed medications the first things that come to mind? Maybe because you spend too much time getting poked, prodded, and tested in a doctor’s office? Medical services are essential, but they are not the only factors influencing our health.

Over the past years, the medical community and local social service providers have recognized that to improve an individual’s health and health outcomes there must be a broader approach by addressing the social, economic, and environmental factors that affect our health. These social determinants of health (SDOH) such as adequate nutrition, safe and affordable housing, sufficient income, available and accessible transportation, and social connections can significantly impact our health, well-being, and quality of life especially our ability to live independently and age in place.

I have often written about many of the providers that address these social determinants of health: Aging and People with Disabilities in Oregon, Klickitat County Senior Services, Skamania County Senior Services, CAPECO Area Agency on Aging, Housing Resource Center, transportation providers, local senior centers and meal sites, and the many volunteer organizations such as Circles of Care.

I know I depend on the medical community. I seem to have a doctor for every organ in my body!  Access to health care is critical, but now there is also a greater understanding of how addressing the social determinants of health can reduce the risk of physical disease, mental illness, and even death.

But as you may know, accessing the many available services is not easy. One response has been employing community health workers such as Joel Pelayo, a senior community health worker for The Next Door, Inc., who is profiled in this month’s “Through the Eyes of an Elder”. Community health workers such as Joel have a deep connection with their community and can provide the personal and caring support when connecting individuals with the needed health and social service providers that will improve their quality of life and health outcomes. I encourage you to read his personal story to appreciate the important work Joel does in our communities.

To better understand the importance of social connections, the Aging in the Gorge Alliance is distributing the bestseller Together, The Healing Power of Human Connection in a Sometimes Lonely World by former Surgeon General Vivek H. Murthy, MD. This timely book explores the importance of human connection, the hidden impact of loneliness on our health, and the social power of community. You can pick up a copy after July 15th at the libraries in Hood River, The Dalles, and White Salmon.

There will be discussion groups in September where participants can connect with others and consider how to increase connections in their lives and their communities. More information will be coming, but if you have questions now you can contact Britta Willson at bwillson@gobhi.org.

Brain Tease: Find the next number in these number sequences:

a.       a.       1, 3, 4, 7, 11, 18, ?

b    b.    4, 7, 15, 29, 59, 117, ?

              c.     2, 4, 5, 10, 12, 24, 27, ?

The 1960 hit novelty song sung by Brian Hyland included the lyrics, and you can sing along, “Two, three, four, tell the people what she wore. It was an itsy bitsy teenie weenie yellow polka dot bikini.” Because of the July 4th holiday, I have once again submitted this column early and will announce next week all those with the correct answer.

During my long-ago days of lifeguarding, when I wasn’t embarrassed wearing a Speedo and before I knew about wrinkly skin and melanoma, I would go to great lengths to develop a tan. For this week’s “Remember When” question, when Coppertone tanning lotion wasn’t enough, what was commonly used as an inexpensive way to get that appealing deep tan? Email your answer to mcseniorcenter@gmail.com, leave a message at 541-296-4788, or mail it with a bottle of SPF 50 broad-spectrum sunscreen.

Well, it has been another week, wishing for fall during the heat of summer. Until we meet again, be cool, keep cool, and whatever you do – don’t blow your cool.

“I never feel more alone than when I’m trying to put sunscreen on my back.”

—Jimmy Kimmel

Answer:

a.        Answers:

            a.   29   (a+b=c, b+c=d, c+d=e, …)

b.                 b.    235   (×2-1, ×2+1, ×2-1, …)

c.                 c.   54   (×2, +1, ×2, +2, ×2, +3, ×2, +4, …)

Aging Well in the Gorge June 29th 2022

Technology offers tremendous benefits: staying connected with family and friends, virtual medical visits, accessing services from your home, and immediately contacting help in case of a fall – all things that can help you stay in your home longer.

But you may be thinking, “I know, I know, but it is so FRUSTRATING!” And it is! There is so much to understand. I mean what is this “Internet of Things”? What is the benefit of PayPal?  Where is this cloud everyone talks about? And why is this robotic dog barking at me?

But a basic knowledge about current technologies can be frustrating and but can also improve your life and help you stay as independent as possible. To help older adults learn more about the benefits of technology, GOBHI in partnership with Senior Planet is again offering five lectures and one class facilitated by locally trained volunteers. And this time they will be held at both the Mid-Columbia Senior Center (MCSC) in The Dalles (1112 W 9th Street) and the Hood River Valley Adult Center (HRVAC) in Hood River (2010 Sterling Place).

There is one lecture for each of five consecutive weeks starting July 12th on Tuesdays at MCSC from 2:00 – 3:15 pm and starting July 13th on Wednesdays at HRVAC from 3:00pm – 4:15pm.

The weekly lectures cover the following topics. Week one: Smartphones. Week two: Cloud Storage. Week three: Google Workspace. Week four: Internet of Things. Week five: eBay and PayPal.

Following the five weekly lectures, there will be a five-week IPAD ESSENTIALS class. For this class, there will be two sessions each week starting August 16that the Mid-Columbia Senior Center on Tuesdays and Thursdays from 2:00 – 3:15, and starting August 17th at the Hood River Valley Adult Center on Wednesdays and Fridays from 3:00 – 4:25.

You must bring an iPad device! But if you don’t have one, the Area Agency on Aging has them available to loan – for free! Call 541-276-1926.

 

You will also need a Gmail address and Apple ID. If you need help setting up a Gmail address or Apple ID or have any tech questions, please call the FREE Senior Planet hotline: 844-410-0268 available from 9am – 5pm EDT, Monday through Friday. (That’s 6:00 – 2:00 for us left coast folks.) If you have questions about the local classes you can call (541) 256-4623 or email Britta Willson at  bwillson@gobhi.org

While helping facilitate the previous classes I heard about Gorge Learns (www.gorgelearns.com) a fascinating website that provides educational resources on the history, art, science, and technology in the Gorge through collaboration with local partners in Gorge cultural institutions. Gorge Learns is an outreach project of The History Museum of Hood River County with funding made possible through the History Museum and grants from Oregon Humanities and the Providence Foundation.

Brain Tease: When I was in grade school, I imagined I was an international spy deciphering secret coded messages. You won’t save the world from destruction but see if you can break this code to answer a simple riddle.

Why do chickens lay eggs? JG UIFZ ESPQ UIFN UIFZ CSFBL

The 1963 American musical romantic comedy film that was inspired by Elvis Presley being drafted into the Army and made Ann-Margret a superstar was Bye Bye Birdie. I received only two correct answers from Lana Tepfer and Margo Dameier who are both winners of a quilt raffle ticket. But three others, Kim Birge, Keith Clymer, and Doug Nelson instead remembered the 1964 box office hit Viva Las Vegas starring both Elvis Presley and Ann Margaret – which led to an off-screen affair. And again, I’ve missed several folks. This time Debbie Medina and Marlene and Keith Clymer.

These hot days of summer remind me of going to the pool in my “baggies” and seeing the girls wearing this controversial type of bathing suit popularized in a 1960 hit song. For this week’s “Remember When” question, in that song the girls were wearing an “Itsy Bitsy Teenie Weenie” what? Email your answer to mcseniorcenter@gmail.com, leave a message at 541-296-4788, or mail it with a picture of Brian Hyland.

Well, it’s been another week, keeping an eye on the temperature. Until we meet again, take time to challenge yourself – if only by trying to program the new air conditioner!

“Time you enjoyed wasting is not wasted time.” T. S. Eliot

Aging Well in the Gorge June 22nd 2022

 Besides the warm weather, summer trips, and struggling to manage the overgrown garden, summer is the time when you can enjoy fresh local produce and meet the people who grow it at one of the many Farmers’ Markets in the Gorge. You may have your own ways of shopping at a Farmers’ Market but here are several quick tips to make the best of your experience.

1.) Plan ahead. Have an idea of what you need. To see what is available, check out the market’s website or Facebook page. And if you need a ride, call your local public transportation provider to learn how they can help you get there.

2.) Bring a bag. Having a bag that can go on your shoulder will help keep your hands free. Or try a backpack! And a mini cooler with a few damp paper towels can keep highly perishable items like fresh herbs and certain vegetables from wilting on the way home. When you leave, you don’t want to look like a circus performer juggling your newly purchased fresh meats, vegetable, and fruits!

3.) Ask questions. Get to know your local farmers. Take the opportunity to ask any questions you may have about the food and how it’s been grown.

4.) Try something new. Challenge yourself to try at least one new food item. How about the vegetables Arugula or Kale?

6.) Make a farm-to-table meal. Now, use everything you bought to prepare a tasty locally grown meal.

And don’t forget the basic sanitary practices: make sure meat is kept cold in a closed, iced cooler; keep it separate from other fresh produce to prevent cross-contamination; rinse your fruits and vegetables and pat them dry with a clean paper towel; use separate cutting boards for produce and raw meat; and as our parents told us always wash your hands first. Remember, you are the last line of defense in reducing the risk of foodborne illness.

To find information about all the local Farmers’ Markets go online to https://gorgegrown.com. But for those of you who can’t, here is a quick listing of the time and places for all the local Farmers’ Markets.

Hood River: Saturday, 9:00 am to 1:00 pm; 5th and Columbia lot in downtown Hood River.

The Dalles: Saturdays, 9:00 am – 1:00 pm; downtown City Park, Union and E. 5th Street.

White Salmon: Tuesdays 4:00 pm – 7:00 pm; Rhinegarten Park at 282 N Main Avenue.

Goldendale: Saturdays: 9:00 am – 2:00 pm; Chamber lawn, 903 E Broadway.

Odell – Mercado del Valle Farmers’ Market: Thursdays, July 7th and 21st, August 4th and 18th, and September 1st and 15th4:00 pm – 6:00 pm; Mid-Valley Elementary School, 3683 Davis Drive.

Stevenson: Saturdays 10:00 am – 2:00 pm; the Waterfront at 140 S Cascade Ave.

Brain Tease: I shared these two riddles five years ago and you would think I would remember both answers. Well, I did for the first, but I couldn’t for the second – it was a little too cerebral for me. See if you can do better.

1.) How many times can you subtract 5 from 25? 2.) Imagine you are in a dark room. How do you get out? 

The portable radios popular in the ’60s and ’70s were called transistor radios. I received correct answers from Doug Nelson, Jess Birge, Lana Tepfer, Donna Mollett, Dave Lutgens, Margo Dameier, Jim Tindall, Rhonda Spies, and since this week I’m in a generous mood both Tiiu Vahtel and Scott Franke are winners of a quilt raffle ticket. Last week I missed Rebecca Abrams.

This 1963 American musical romantic comedy film was inspired by the sensation of singer Elvis Presley being drafted into the United States Army in 1957. For this week’s “Remember When” question, what was the name of this movie that is credited with making Ann-Margret a superstar during the mid-1960s? Email your answer to mcseniorcenter@gmail.com, leave a message at 541-296-4788, or mail it with an autographed picture of teen idol Bobby Rydell who played the part of Hugo.

Answer: 1.) Only once. 2.) Stop imagining. 

Well, it’s been another week, watching the weeds keep growing taller. Until we meet again, keep your nose clean and your hands dirty, because as the old farmer from Fossil once said “Sometimes you get, and sometimes you get got.

“The human race has one really effective weapon, and that is laughter.” — Mark Twain

Aging Well in the Gorge June 15th 2022

Life is full of risks: stepping out of the shower, driving down I-84, walking around the neighborhood, flying the friendly skies to visit the grandchildren, speaking in public. Many of those risks we try to avoid, others we find ways to reduce, and still others we ignore the risk and proceed full steam ahead. Choosing one of those options was a difficult choice many of us made during the pandemic.

When calculating risk, we rarely rely on rational calculations but instead are influenced by emotional perceptions, the context of the situation, and personal experience. That is called our perception of risk. This can cause us to overact to risks that trigger us emotionally and underreact to risks that do not.

Then there is actual risk. It is more objective and quantifiable such as the likelihood and severity of the consequence of taking that risk. 

You may not be surprised, but our perceived risk is not always in line with the actual risk.

For example, I feel much safer driving than flying.  While driving I feel I have greater control. And flying? Who can forget all the catastrophic aircraft incidents we’ve heard about? But as you probably know, statistically flying is far safer than driving. The greater risk is driving to the airport.

One risk most of us are familiar with is the risk of falling. I imagine there are very few of you who haven’t fallen at least once in the last ten years. One reason older adults fall more often is we frequently overestimate our physical ability and take unnecessary risks of falling. Have you taken the shorter ‘risky’ path covered in ice, instead of the longer, ‘safe’ path? For myself, I perceived the risk of falling when walking down steps as very low. And then I missed a bottom step, fell, and broke my hip. Now that I have experienced the actual risk, I ALWAYS hold on to the handrail when walking down any stairs.

When assessing our risk, we should go beyond what we feel, and realistically appraise our physical abilities both our strengths and weaknesses to avoid unnecessary risks with serious consequences. We may be wiser, but we are no longer that spry twenty-something!

To live a full and rewarding life we need to take risks. And the right to take reasonable risks is essential for our dignity and self-esteem. So be adventurous – but also smart. And although they want the best for you, don’t always listen to your overly cautious and protective adult children!

Brain Tease: In my hand, I have two coins that are newly minted. Together, they total 30 cents. One isn’t a nickel. What are the coins?

The correct answer to May 25’s “Remember When’ question was Bell Bottoms. I received answers from Chuck Rice, Rhonda Spies, Lana Tepfer, Nona Moore, Kim Birge, Dave Lutgens, Rose Schulz, Margo Dameier, Doug Nelson, and Marlene Clymer this week’s winner of a quilt raffle ticket.

And from last week, the American comedian who in 1972 first used “seven dirty words” in one of his monologues was the irreverent George Carlin. I received correct answers from Rebecca Abrams who was “right on!”, Keith Clymer, Jess Birge, Steven Woolpert, Barbara Cadwell, Margo Dameier, Lana Tepfer, Dave Lutgens, Rose Schulz, and this week’s winner of a quilt raffle ticket Cheryl Rockowski who reminded me of “a blast from the past” – another popular expression from the 60s.

This singer-songwriter with her writing partner Gerry Goffin wrote such hits as “Take Good Care of My Baby” “Up on the Roof”, “One Fine Day”, and “(You Make Me Feel Like) A Natural Woman” for Aretha Franklin. What was the name of this artist who recorded Tapestry which won the 1972 Grammy Award for album of the year? Email your answer to mcseniorcenter@gmail.com, leave a message at 541-296-4788, or mail it with a copy of her memoir A Natural Woman.

Well, it’s been another week, looking up and down and all around for that elusive wisdom of old age. Until we meet again, as Dave Barry wrote, life is too short to not be a part of something stupid – but that doesn’t mean climbing a 15-foot ladder!

“There’s something liberating about not pretending. Dare to embarrass yourself. Risk.” – Drew Barrymore

 

Answer: One wasn’t a nickel but the other one was. So, the answer is a quarter and a nickel.

Aging Well in the Gorge June 8th 2022

 Life is full of risks: stepping out of the shower, driving down I-84, walking around the neighborhood, flying the friendly skies to visit the grandchildren, speaking in public. Many of those risks we try to avoid, others we find ways to reduce, and still others we ignore the risk and proceed full steam ahead. Choosing one of those options was a difficult choice many of us made during the pandemic.

When calculating risk, we rarely rely on rational calculations but instead are influenced by emotional perceptions, the context of the situation, and personal experience. That is called our perception of risk. This can cause us to overact to risks that trigger us emotionally and underreact to risks that do not.

Then there is actual risk. It is more objective and quantifiable such as the likelihood and severity of the consequence of taking that risk. 

You may not be surprised, but our perceived risk is not always in line with the actual risk.

For example, I feel much safer driving than flying.  While driving I feel I have greater control. And flying? Who can forget all the catastrophic aircraft incidents we’ve heard about? But as you probably know, statistically flying is far safer than driving. The greater risk is driving to the airport.

One risk most of us are familiar with is the risk of falling. I imagine there are very few of you who haven’t fallen at least once in the last ten years. One reason older adults fall more often is we frequently overestimate our physical ability and take unnecessary risks of falling. Have you taken the shorter ‘risky’ path covered in ice, instead of the longer, ‘safe’ path? For myself, I perceived the risk of falling when walking down steps as very low. And then I missed a bottom step, fell, and broke my hip. Now that I have experienced the actual risk, I ALWAYS hold on to the handrail when walking down any stairs.

When assessing our risk, we should go beyond what we feel, and realistically appraise our physical abilities both our strengths and weaknesses to avoid unnecessary risks with serious consequences. We may be wiser, but we are no longer that spry twenty-something!

To live a full and rewarding life we need to take risks. And the right to take reasonable risks is essential for our dignity and self-esteem. So be adventurous – but also smart. And although they want the best for you, don’t always listen to your overly cautious and protective adult children!

Brain Tease: In my hand, I have two coins that are newly minted. Together, they total 30 cents. One isn’t a nickel. What are the coins?

The correct answer to May 25’s “Remember When’ question was Bell Bottoms. I received answers from Chuck Rice, Rhonda Spies, Lana Tepfer, Nona Moore, Kim Birge, Dave Lutgens, Rose Schulz, Margo Dameier, Doug Nelson, and Marlene Clymer this week’s winner of a quilt raffle ticket.

And from last week, the American comedian who in 1972 first used “seven dirty words” in one of his monologues was the irreverent George Carlin. I received correct answers from Rebecca Abrams who was “right on!”, Keith Clymer, Jess Birge, Steven Woolpert, Barbara Cadwell, Margo Dameier, Lana Tepfer, Dave Lutgens, Rose Schulz, and this week’s winner of a quilt raffle ticket Cheryl Rockowski who reminded me of “a blast from the past” – another popular expression from the 60s.

This singer-songwriter with her writing partner Gerry Goffin wrote such hits as

“Take Good Care of My Baby” “Up on the Roof”, “One Fine Day”, and “(You Make Me Feel Like) A Natural Woman” for Aretha Franklin. What was the name of this artist who recorded Tapestry which won the 1972 Grammy Award for album of the year? Email your answer to mcseniorcenter@gmail.com, leave a message at 541-296-4788, or mail it with a copy of her memoir A Natural Woman.

Well, it’s been another week, looking up and down and all around for that elusive wisdom of old age. Until we meet again, as Dave Barry wrote, life is too short to not be a part of something stupid – but that doesn’t mean climbing a 15-foot ladder!

“There’s something liberating about not pretending. Dare to embarrass yourself. Risk.” – Drew Barrymore

 Answer: One wasn’t a nickel but the other one was. So, the answer is a quarter and a nickel.

 

Aging Well in the Gorge June 1st 2022

Do you ever feel out of date like an old 45 record in an age of digital music? One possible reason is that each new generation tries to separate themselves from older generations by creating their own language or slang words – as we did when we were young.

If you grew up in the 50s, you may remember “knuckle sandwich”, “shiner”, “made in the shade”, or “the royal shaft”. If you were a child of the 60s, how about “far out”, “dig it”, (“It’s) a gas”, “mellow”, “bummer”, and of course “groovy”.  For you younger readers who grew up in the 70s, there was “psyche”, “don’t be such a spaz”, and “up your nose with a rubber hose” popularized by Vinnie Barbarino in the TV show Welcome Back, Kotter. Over time each generation has introduced its own slang. But unless you are a real “dork”, you probably won’t be using most of those slang words – unless you want to get that look of “When were you born?”

Those expressions are innocent anachronisms from our youth. But there are also words we consider vulgar and offensive and those too change over time. For example, when my son was elected 2003 senior class president in high school, he ended his acceptance speech with “We’re going to have a “badass” year!” Well, that didn’t go over well – except with his classmates – and he was disqualified. He knew it wasn’t acceptable, but in his defense, he argued words considered unacceptable are always changing. (The same can be said about what you can wear to school. I remember when boys couldn’t wear jeans and girls had to wear skirts.)

Today we may accept the use of “badass” – or maybe not? But what is difficult to accept for many of us is the excessive use of words we find offensive. I know many friends who won’t watch certain television shows because of all the swear words – particularly the use of “bleep” which seems to be common in entertainment and music these days, Once I tried to watch who I heard was considered a popular cutting edge young comedian on Netflix, but I couldn’t get past the first five minutes. If I was in the audience, I would have been squirming in my seat. It was just too much of a bad thing. Maybe you have had similar situations.

When we were young, we weren’t so direct. We used euphemisms for words that were considered vulgar: “What the fudge”, “dagnammit”, “Jiminy cricket”, “Oh, shoot”. I remember being shocked when my 8th-grade football coach told a lineman to keep his “butt” up.  In my family, we didn’t use that word!

What language we think is “cool” and what we think is vulgar is different for each of us and each generation. We may feel that the freedom of speech to say anything you want has gone too far and just isn’t right, but it isn’t the end of the world. Words we consider offensive today will lose their power to offend, and new words will take their place. It wasn’t that long ago when the public was shocked to hear Rhett Butler end “Gone With The Wind” with the famous line “Frankly, my dear, I don’t give a damn.”

Brain Tease: You’re escaping a labyrinth and there are three exits. Exit A leads to an inferno. Exit B leads to an assassin. Exit C leads to a lion that hasn’t eaten in 3 years. Which exit do you pick?

Because of Memorial Day, I submitted this column early so I will mention everyone who answered last week’s question next week.

in 1972 an American comedian used in one of his monologues the “seven dirty words”. For this week’s “Remember When” question who was this comedian and social critic? Email your answer to mcseniorcenter@gmail.com, leave a message at 541-296-4788, or mail it with the forecast from the “hippy-dippy weatherman”.

Well, it’s been another week, trying to focus among all the distractions. Until we meet again, if you ever get down, there is always more than one way to get back up.

“If you feel you are doing as much at seventy as you did when you were twenty, you must have not been doing much at twenty.”

 

Answer: Exit C. If a lion hasn’t eaten in 3 years, it has definitely starved to death.

Aging Well in the Gorge May 25th 2022

 Senior Living May 25th, 2022

Think back to when you were young. There was energy and enthusiasm; the future was a banquet of choices and opportunities, so many things to do and so little time to do them. And “Yet, knowing how way leads on to way, I doubted if I should ever come back.” Robert Frost describes the dilemma we all face in life where one choice precludes so many others. And for various reasons: pursuing a career, raising a family, or just making ends meet, we gallop down one road not expecting to ever revisit those missed opportunities.

But in her book “Secrets of Becoming a Late Bloomer” Connie Goldman discusses how by rediscovering an interest or passion we had early in life, a road now overgrown and hidden from view, we can again experience the excitement and enthusiasm of our youth and be involved, creative and aware through the next chapter of our lives.

To help rediscover these forgotten interests, write down every activity in your life that has brought you great pleasure and satisfaction and what you particularly liked about them. You may also want to make a list of things you wanted to do but never had the time to do. Use these lists to help identify those pleasurable activities you may now want to pursue. Spend some time contemplating them; don’t rush. And during this exploration, be open to new possibilities. Give yourself permission to stretch and grow by trusting in yourself and your curiosity. And don’t worry about looking foolish, inept, or not acting your age. As we age there is less pressure to draw within the lines; we can create our own pictures. Then share them with a close supportive friend or loved one who knows you well and who you can trust to be honest. Get their advice and support. You may need their gentle encouragement to get you moving on a new road of self-discovery.

You may discover now is the time to write, to paint, to entertain, to educate, or to heal. We all know many people in their 60s, 70s, and 80s who have rediscovered a purpose whether it is local history, grief counseling, dance, or ministry that has given them new energy, a new drive and enthusiasm for life. Growth and change continue until we die. We can decide to live an active life, but we can also decide how to live that active life full of passion and purpose. Our most satisfying discoveries may still be ahead of us.

Brain Tease: Here again is a mental exercise whose aim is to stimulate the associations between words in your temporal lobe. Find the third word that is associated with these given pairs of words. (I found these more difficult than last week’s.)

5. RIVER — MONEY; 6. BED — PAPER; 7. ARMY — WATER; 8. TENNIS — NOISE; 9. EGYPTIAN — MOTHER; 10. SMOKER — PLUMBER

The comedy-drama television series that aired on CBS from 1972 to 1983 and depicted the 4077th during the Korean War was M*A*S*H. I received correct answers from Chuck Rice, Sam Bilyeu, Billie Maxwell, Lana Tepfer, Rhonda Spies, Keith Clymer, Jess Birge, Margo Dameier, Maria Kollas, Patty Burnet, Dave Lutgens, Linda Frizzell, Pat Evenson-Brady, and this week’s winner of a quilt raffle ticket Rose Shultz who reminded me MASH stood for Mobile Army Surgical Hospital.

A while back, I won’t mention how far back, there were poodle skirts, “letter” sweaters, go-go boots, and miniskirts. Another extremely popular fashion during the 60s and 70s was this style of pants where the legs flared out below the knee. For this week’s “Remember When” question, what was the name for this style of pants often considered  a symbol of old-fashioned bad taste but to this day continues to make fashion comebacks as flared pants? Email your answer to mcseniorcenter@gmail.com, leave a message at 541-296-4788, or mail it with a pair made by cutting the outside leg seam and sewing in a triangle of fabric to widen the leg.

Well, it’s been another week, trying to keep an eye on the bouncing ball. Until we meet again, as Pogo observed “Don’t take life so serious, son, it ain’t no how permanent.”

“The grass may be greener on the other side of the fence, but it doesn’t matter if you’re not able to climb over.” Farmer Wisdom

Answers: Bank (Flow is also possible); Sheet; Tank; Racquet; Mummy; Pipe

Nutritious home-delivered and in-person meals are available at noon Monday through Friday unless otherwise noted.

Seniors of Mosier Valley (541-980-1157) – Mondays and Wednesdays; Hood River Valley Adult Center (541-386-2060); Sherman County Senior and Community Center (541-565-3191); The Dalles Meals-on-Wheels (541-298-8333)

For meal sites in Washington, call Klickitat County Senior Services – Goldendale office (509-773-3757) or the White Salmon office (509-493-3068); Skamania County Senior Services (509-427-3990).

Aging Well in the Gorge May 18th 2022

Do you use the Internet? According to a 2021 Pew Research survey, 75% of adults 65 and older said they were Internet users: emailing friends, following social media, accessing financial information, shopping online, or checking health information – all sensitive online information you want to protect.

There are many ways to increase your online security, Password Managers or Multi-Factor Authorization, but the first place to start is to make sure you have a strong password.

Most passwords are made up of letters, numbers, and symbols to confirm you are who you say you are—when you’re using a computer system. But it can be overwhelming trying to remember all of them!

So what do most of us do – or at least I do? We use the same password for all our online accounts. But you can see the risk. If someone steals your password for one account, they can access all your other accounts. Not good.

So what are some tips and tricks to create a strong unique password that can keep the bad guys away from your online information?

Use long password combinations consisting of a combination of uppercase and lowercase letters, numbers, and special symbols. They should be at least 12 characters long, although it is recommended to use ones that are even longer.

Your passwords should not be based on your personal information: a nickname, your date of birth, or your pet’s name.

And a good password should be unique for each online account.

Here is a good example of a strong password: X5j13$#eCM1cG@Kdc. But who is going to remember that? Not me!

To create passwords that are easier to remember and still strong try these suggestions.

Use the Sentence Method. Choose a sentence, phrase, or a quote and take the first letters from that phrase and add numbers and punctuation to generate a seemingly random combination of characters. For example: “One for all and all for one”: The Three Musketeers becomes 14A&A413Mu$keteers!

Use the Dictionary Method. Choose a few words from the dictionary and string them together along with numbers and symbols. You could use ocean, beach, wind, sand to create the secure password: Ocean%Wind7Beach/Sand4

And as I mentioned, your password should be unique for every account. So rather than creating a whole new password for each account, simply add a different code to your password. For example, building on the above password, your Apple account password would be Ocean%Wind7Beach/Sand4APPL and your Google account password would be Ocean%Wind7Beach/Sand4GOOG.

Finally, a couple of suggestions from personal experience. Make sure you set up your security questions for your most sensitive online accounts, so when you forget your password, which you will do, you’ll be able to answer the questions to create a new password. And make sure someone you trust knows where you keep your passwords in case something happens to you.

Data leaks happen every day, and the next one could have your password in it. To protect your online information, a strong password is your first line of defense.

Brain Tease: Find the third word that is associated with a given pair of words. For the words PIANO and LOCK, the answer is KEY. Enjoy.

1. SHIP — CARD; 2. TREE — CAR; 3. SCHOOL — EYE; 4. PILLOW — COURT

The name of the competition where boys and girls would race down Akron, Ohio’s world-famous Derby Downs’ hill was the Soap Box Derby. I received correct answers from Billie Maxwell, Chuck Rice, Rhonda Spies, Lana Tepfer, Maria Kollas, Keith Clymer, and Pat Evenson-Brady this week’s winner of a quilt raffle ticket. 

This television series was a must-see for many of us when it aired on CBS from 1972 to 1983. For this week’s “Remember When” question, what was the name of this war comedy-drama television series that included an ensemble of memorable characters: “Hawkeye” Pierce, “Trapper” John, Frank Burns, Margaret “Hot Lips” Houlihan, Henry Blake, “Radar” O’Reilly, Maxwell Klinger, and Father Mulcahy. Email your answer to mcseniorcenter@gmail.com, leave a message at 541-296-4788, or mail it with a DVD of the 1970 movie on which the television series was based.

Well, it’s been another week, avoiding the potholes of life.  Until we meet again, don’t let the rotten apples spoil your day.

“I may not have gone where I intended to go, but I think I have ended up where I needed to be.” Douglas Adams

Answers: Deck; Trunk; Pupil; Case

Aging Well in the Gorge May 11th, 2022

The Gorge has its unique beauty, history, and geology making it the wonderful place we call home. You can visit local art centers and museums, enjoy breathtaking vistas and recreational opportunities, and attend local events that take place every week. I wish I could mention all the exciting activities you could attend, but there just isn’t enough space.

But there’s always the exception, right? And this week I want to highlight three special activities in the Gorge that might appeal to us more mature adults – and you won’t have to spend hours fighting traffic in Portland to get there.

If you enjoy fine music, on May 15th, The Gorge Winds Concert Band is returning for their Spring Concert directed by Danny Schneider. The performance begins at 3:00 and doors open for seating at 2:30. It will be held at the Zion Lutheran Church (101 W 10th St, The Dalles). The suggested donation is $5.00 per person. Masks are optional but you will need to show proof of vaccination at the door.

If you appreciate the history and natural wonders of the Gorge, the Columbia Gorge Discovery Center & Museum will be celebrating its 25th anniversary with an all-day event on Saturday, May 21st. You are welcome to join the free festivities from 9 am. to 5 pm. A short commemoration ceremony will kick off the event. A ticketed salmon bake lunch will be offered from Warm Springs-owned Salmon King Fisheries and The Dalles’ Cobblestone Catering. Museum admission will be free for the day. Go to www.gorgediscovery.org or call (541) 296-8600 ext. 201 for more information and to purchase salmon bake tickets.

And if you enjoy the wonders of gardening, Central Gorge Master Gardener Association is hosting their Garden Tour on June 18, from 9 am to 1 pm. The tour will feature four beautiful gardens in White Salmon. Each garden is full of lovely plants and unique features that bring enjoyment to garden owners and their visitors. A special educational focus of the tour will be growing fruits and vegetables at home. Tickets are $15 apiece and to purchase tickets or for more information go online at https://blogs.oregonstate.edu/cgmga/. Tickets are also available at the following locations: Waucoma Book Store, Good News Gardening, and OSU Hood River Extension Office in Hood River, Dickey Farms in Bingen, Bloomsbury in Stevenson, or on June 18th you can purchase tickets at Rheingarten Park in White Salmon. And to request accommodations because of a disability, contact Megan Wickersham at 541-386-3343 (x38257) megan.wickersham@oregonstate.eduby June 10th.

So, mark your calendar. You don’t want to miss these wonderful opportunities during this merry month of May – and June.

In this week’s Brain Tease you must find the pattern that relates these numbers in order to find the missing numbers in the series.

1.) 2,6,14,26,42,?;

2.) 4,2,7,5,10,8,13,?;

3.) 1, 5, 13, 29, ?, ?.

The names of the anchors who hosted the nightly news program on NBC from 1956 through 1970 and signed off each night with “Good night, Chet. Good night, David. And good night, for NBC News.” were Chet Huntley and David Brinkley. I received correct answers from Mike McFarlane, Stephen Woolpert, Sam Bilyeu, Betsy Ayres, Chuck Rice, Lana Tepfer, Rhonda Spies, Kim Birge, Rebecca Abrams, Patty Burnet, Dave Lutgens, Doug Nelson, Linda Frizzell, and Maria Kollas this week’s winner of a quilt raffle ticket.

The idea for this competition came from a Dayton, Ohio newsman who in 1933 came across a group of boys racing their homemade cars in the summer. From those humble beginnings, thousands of boys and girls from eight to twenty raced their unpowered cars down Akron, Ohio’s world-famous Derby Downs’ 989-foot hill relying completely upon gravity. For this week’s “Remember When” question what is the name of this annual competition? Email your answer to mcseniorcenter@gmail.com, leave a message at 541-296-4788, or mail it with two tickets to Senior Day on August 11thwhen older adults can live their childhood fantasy of racing down Derby Downs Hill.

Brain Tease answer: 1.) 62; 2.) 11; 3.) 61 and 125

Well, it’s been another week, looking for the right answer behind every closed door. Until we meet again, there’s something to be said for just staying calm.

“Fear less, hope more; Eat less, chew more; Whine less, breathe more; Talk less, say more; Love more, and all good things will be yours” Swedish Proverb